Leslie Alcock worked as Mortimer Wheeler’s deputy on the excavations of Mohenjo-Daro, India. Appointed a lecturer in archaeology at University College of Wales, Cardiff in 1953, he remained for twenty years, becoming a pioneer of ‘Dark Age’ archaeology. He is widely remembered for his ground-breaking excavation of the early medieval princely site at Dinas Powys (Glamorgan), published 1963, and his book Arthur’s Britain (1971). Appointed Professor of archaeology at Glasgow University in 1973.

Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1957.

George Counsell Boon (1927-1994)

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George Counsell Boon

George Counsell Boon

Romano-British archaeologist and numismatist. He excavated at Silchester (Calleva Atrebatum), Caerleon (Isca, fortress of the Second Augustan Legion) and elsewhere. After working at Reading Museum (1950-6), he made his career in the National Museum of Wales (1956-89; Keeper of Archaeology & Numismatics 1976-87, Senior Curator 1987-9). He was instrumental in developing numismatics as a discipline at the Museum. Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1955; Vice-President 1979-83.

Glyn Daniel (1914-1986)

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Glyn Daniel

Born in Pembrokeshire, Glyn Daniel was educated in Llantwit Major, Barry, and St John's College Cambridge.

His doctoral thesis covered the chambered tombs of England and Wales, a study area he later expanded with work in France. Daniel did much to popularise archaeology through his editorship of the leading journal Antiquity, his Ancient People and Places series and, most significantly, through his chairmanship of the TV panel game Animal, Vegetable, Mineral.

Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1942.

John Gwynne Evans ('Snail Evans') (1941-2005)

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John Gwynne Evans

Professor of Environmental Archaeology, Cardiff University. Instrumental in creating this sub-discipline, he was the first to undertake a systematic analysis of fossilised assemblages of land snails, environmentally sensitive animals that could be used to interpret past landscapes.

He examined the dramatic vegetation changes that occurred with the introduction of farming, firmly establishing the important role man had played in changing the natural environment.

Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1974.

William Francis Grimes (1905-1988)

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William Francis Grimes

Born in Pembrokeshire, Grimes became Assistant Keeper of Archaeology in the National Museum of Wales in 1926. Later moving to the Ordnance Survey, the Museum of London, and finally to the directorship of the Institute of Archaeology, London. During his time in Wales Grimes published his excavations at the Roman pottery works at Holt, a comprehensive survey of Welsh megalithic tombs and a catalogue of the Museum’s prehistoric collections. Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1934

Michael Grierson Jarrett (1934-1994)

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Michael Grierson Jarrett

Michael Grierson Jarrett

Romano-British archaeologist. After early career in northern England, Jarrett's move to University College Cardiff in 1960 led to an extensive examination and re-dating of Roman forts in Wales, resulting in a revised edition of Nash-Williams' Roman Frontier in Wales. He also excavated the post-medieval village of West Whelpington in Northumberland and the Roman villa of Whitton, Glamorgan.

Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1966.

Hubert Savory (1911-2001)

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Hubert Savory

Born in Norfolk, Savory became Assistant Keeper in the Department of Archaeology at the National Museum of Wales in 1938. Appointed Keeper in 1955, he remained at the Museum until his retirement. He undertook a wide range of work from excavations of prehistoric sites, to new finds reporting and large overviews of entire periods. Savory also maintained an active interest in the archaeology of Spain and Portugal, which culminated in the publication of a monograph in Glyn Daniel’s Ancient Peoples and Places series. Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1947.

Arnold Joseph Taylor (1911-2002)

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Conwy Castle about 1868-70 (© Cadw: Crown Copyright)

Conwy Castle about 1868-70 (© Cadw: Crown Copyright)

The architectural historian Arnold Taylor spent his career in the Ancient Monuments Inspectorate, eventually holding the position of Chief Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings for the whole of Britain. In retirement he became President of the Society of Antiquaries. His work on King Edward I’s castles of north Wales is arguably his most enduring legacy.

Elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries 1942; President 1975-78